A match for Cadillac and Lincoln?

Advantages

  • Cloud-like luck
  • Audi-like interior
  • Scenic Cruiser Visibility

Disadvantages

  • Hellcat thirsty for fuel
  • Overzealous stability control

If neither the Lincoln Navigator Black Label nor the Cadillac Escalade Platinum quite scratch your jumbo luxo-ute itch, then the new Grand Wagoneer from Jeep (on a modified Ram chassis) is almost certain to please. It somehow manages to deliver quintessential American luxury in a fresh and authentic way.

Inside, the vibe is vaguely mid-century mod without plagiarizing Lincoln, while outdoing Cadillac’s curved OLED screens with up to 75 cumulative screen inches that all manage to present information worth looking at. Options include a passenger movie screen that remains invisible to the driver and a “relax mode” visible to everyone when parked, which can show things like a crackling fireplace.

MT employees were mostly impressed by the wood trim with inlaid metal lettering, the thick leather with contrast stitching, and the rich tones and deep bass emanating from the McIntosh 23-speaker reference sound system. “It’s peak Americana … more, more, more. There’s too much leather, too much wood, too many screens. It’s so wasteful, and yet so gorgeous. And roomy. Oh so roomy,” says senior editor Greg Fink . The third row of seats on this “short wheelbase” Grand Wagoneer matches the legroom of a Cadillac Escalade and EXT while exceeding their head, shoulder and hip room measurements. The Lincoln Navigator is bigger for passenger space, but the blocky Wagoneer is the cargo champ, and we expect its long-wheelbase cousin to truly deserve the title bestowed by editor-in-chief Mike Floyd: “Lord Humongous, ruler of the monster SUV desert.”

Associate Road Test Editor Erick Ayapana praised the 6.4-liter “monster of an engine” and smooth transmission, but we were all let down by the Jeep’s overly aggressive stability control, which completely chops all power at the slightest hint of understeer, making it impossible to generate meaningful lateral-g or figure-eight test results. And while the steering lacked feel, its light effort makes this jumbotron more maneuverable.

Judges also complained about the sun-reflective and hot piano black trim that made it difficult to see the suspension height and ride position choices. Guest judge and engineering expert Gordon Dickie noted some tire slap and secondary chassis vibration on the simulated 110 freeway section as well as some shift shock. Senior editor Jonny Lieberman hated the tall, blocky side view, and buying guide Zach Gale worried that “the kids of a Grand Wagoneer owner will question why mom or dad needed a 13/18 mpg SUV” when there were more efficient luxury options.

No Grand Wagoneer gets a “Trail Rated” badge, though standard AWD or optional 4WD give it plenty of backcountry capability. We’re a little puzzled by the decision not to include the “Jeep” wordmark anywhere on the vehicle. That name never deterred wealthy Wagoneer buyers in the ’80s and early ’90s, and this one is much better equipped to attract the landed gentry.

Most judges came away very impressed with Jeep’s reincarnation of this venerable marque, and optimistic about its chances of competing against the established Cadillac and Lincoln entries in this space, but felt that its low efficiency rating hampered its chances of earning calipers.

2022 Jeep Grand Wagoneer 4X4 Series III Specifications
Base price/As tested $105,995/$109,980
Power (SAE grid) 471 hp at 6,000 rpm
Torque (SAE grid) 455 lb-ft @ 4,400 rpm
Accel, 0-60 mph 5.7 sec
Quarter mile 14.1 sec @ 99.1 mph
Braking, 60-0 mph 134 feet
Lateral acceleration 0.65 g (average)*
MT figure eight 29.2 sec @ 0.57g (average)*
EPA City/Hwy/Comb 13/18/15 mpg
Vehicle layout Front engine, 4WD, 7-speed, 4-door SUV
Engine, gearbox 6.4L port-injected OHV 16-valve 90-degree V-8, 8-speed automatic
Operating Weight (F/R DIST) 6,358 lb (51/49%)
Wheelbase 123.0 inches
length x width x height 214.7 x 83.6 x 74.0-77.6 inches
For sale Now
*Performance is limited due to electronic stability and traction control

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